Mount Synology NAS in Linux

From some time I am happy user of Synology DiskStation DS218j. I recommend it to all who would like to cut themselves off from the cloud solutions of popular suppliers like Dropbox, Google Drive or Onedrive.

By setting up your private NAS, you have full control over your data, you gain access to your data from each device and additional features such as VPN, web server, backup of your devices, calendar, office package, group work, chat, audio server, video server and many other functions which description can be found on the manufacturer’s website. A one-off expense at the beginning may seem quite large, however, it returns from the first day of use. Personally, I use the Synology solution but there are more companies on the market that produce this type of equipment for home and professional use. If you are interested in such a solution, look for something that will meet all your requirements.

DiskStation Manager

Mounting and mapping shared resources from a NAS server in Windows should not cause major problems. In the Linux system it requires a bit more knowledge but it is possible and with the description below it will become trivial for every intermediate Linux user.

You can mount shares in two ways via SMB/CIFS and NFS. Both solutions are good and fast. It seems to me that the first way is less complicated and requires less configuration. Additionally, it works in any environment with variable configuration of computer IP addresses.

SMB/CIFS

NAS configuration

Log in to your Synology Disk Station Manager and go to Control Panel. Choose File Services in tab SMB/AFP/NFS and select SMB service. Provide name of your Workgroup. Remember name of field Mac (Finder): smb://nas_name. In Advanced Settings you can choose maximum and minimum SMB protocol (if are not sure what to select choose maximum version to SMB3 and minimum to SMB1). Additionally switch Transport Encryption Mode to Auto and select Enable Opportunistic Locking. Now you are ready to mount folders on Linux.

System configuration

Edit hosts file:

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sudo nano /etc/hosts

and add line with IP and name of your NAS.

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xx.xx.xx.xx nas_name

Create folders:

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mkdir /media/nas
mkdir /media/nas/test_folder

Create file with NAS credentials in your home directory:

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nano .smbcredentials

add your NAS credentials:

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username=nas_username
password=nas_password

change permission for this file:

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chmod 0600 ~/.smbcredentials

Install cifs-utils:

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sudo apt install cifs-utils

Edit fstab and add line (this will allow to map your folders automatically on system boot):

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//nas_name/test_folder /media/nas/test_folder cifs credentials=/home/username/.smbcredentials,vers=3.0,uid=1000,gid=1000 0 0

in line above replace values to yours (nas_name, test_folder, path to smbcredentials file.

Now map folders using command:

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sudo mount -a

Do it for all your folders you want to map from NAS and check results in your file explorer.

NFS

NAS configuration

Log in to your Synology Disk Station Manager and go to Control Panel. Choose File Services in tab SMB/AFP/NFS and select NFS service. Now in Control Panel got to Shared Folder. Choose folder you want to mount and hit Edit button, go to NFS Permissions tab. Hit Create button and set fields like this:
Provide IP of your PC.
Privilege set to Read/Write.
Squash to Map root to Admin
Security to sys
and Enable Asynchronous option. Hit OK.

Remember the Mount path on NSF Permissions tab. This info is located at the bottom and looks like: Mount path:/volume1/test_folder

Do the same for all folders you want to mount on Linux machine.

System configuration

Edit hosts file:

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sudo nano /etc/hosts

and add line with IP and name of your NAS.

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xx.xx.xx.xx nas_name

Create folders:

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mkdir /media/nas
mkdir /media/nas/test_folder

Install nfs-common:

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sudo apt install nfs-common

Edit fstab and add line (this will allow to map your folders automatically on system boot):

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nas_name:/volume1/test_folder /media/nas/test_folder nfs rsize=8192,wsize=8192,timeo=14,intr

in line above replace values to yours (nas_name, test_folder).

Now map folders using command:

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sudo mount -a

Do it for all your folders you want to map from NAS and check results in your file explorer.